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InsuranceAround two percent of all students do not have health insurance. To be exact: 1.8 percent of HBO-students and 2.2

percent of university students are walking around uninsured, according to figures recently released by the Central Bureau for Statistics. Of non-students of the same age as university students, 3.5 percent are uninsured. The research has also revealed that 1.5 percent of the Dutch population (241,000 people) do not have basic insurance.Research moneyThe 300 million euro that the Dutch government has earmarked for knowledge and innovation must be invested in independent, fundamental research. This was stated in a letter that Dutch Education Minister Plasterk sent to Dutch universities and research organizations. The millions must spent on research talent, the research infrastructure and on excellent research. In other words, NWO‘s Veni-, Vidi- and Vici-grants will be expanded, money will be allocated to top facilities and 30 new top researchers must be hired.Champion jugglerMechanical engineering student Niels Duinker was recently crowned the Dutch Champion Juggler for 2007. To win the title, he had to beat around 40 other competitors and had to perform ten acts: with balls, with rings and with pins. He performed the nine of the ten acts flawlessly. Just like gymnastics, juggling is a sport judged by a jury. The degree of difficultly of an act determines a certain number of starting points, and mistakes result in point deductions. Winning the title will be good for Duinker's career. It is easier for the entertainment agencies he is registered with to book a champion for parties and events. Duinker performs regularly and give workshops, but when he graduates he hopes to get a job performing on a cruise ship. This year he will receive his BSc degree, but he won't pursue his MSc degree. Duinker: "During my studies I learned to work fast, I have acquired knowledge and discipline and I know about computers. But now I want to go further with juggling."Solar TeamLast week TU Twente unveiled its new solar-powered car. It was the first team in the Netherlands to reveal the car they will be racing in at this year's World Solar Challenge, which will be held in Australia in October. With an innovative adjustable solar panel, the Twente team is aiming to beat their main rivals, TU Delft's Nuna team, which in 2005 won this prestigious solar-powered car race for the third consecutive time.ChampIt was a home match for the France born sailor Thierry Schmitter. Last week the TU Delft alumnus won the Semaine Olympique Franaise gold medal in the paralympic 2.4-classs. Schmitter had won the title even before the last race was sailed. "I have really earned this," the proud sailor said. Schmitter, who a climbing accident left a paraplegic, has been sailing since his youth. To continue to improve, he trains 130 days a year.Bright flight An engineering brain drain is prompting Europe’s largest economy to seek reforms and to try to tempt its talented flock back to the nest, according to a recent article in ASEE Prism. Many German companies have mandatory retirement policies that kick in at age 55, so every year some 60,000 engineers who are still in their prime leave the workforce. In addition, many educated professionals are leaving the country for better opportunities elsewhere . almost 145,000 last year, which is a 32% increase compared to 2001 figures. German engineers offer various reasons for leaving: a difficult labor market, high unemployment rates (now 10.2%), and high taxes (particularly social welfare costs). Solutions being considered by the German government include lowering barriers to importing engineers from other countries, increasing the number of engineering graduates in specific fields, and educational reform that will help future generations of engineers remain marketable throughout their entire careers.

InsuranceAround two percent of all students do not have health insurance. To be exact: 1.8 percent of HBO-students and 2.2 percent of university students are walking around uninsured, according to figures recently released by the Central Bureau for Statistics. Of non-students of the same age as university students, 3.5 percent are uninsured. The research has also revealed that 1.5 percent of the Dutch population (241,000 people) do not have basic insurance.Research moneyThe 300 million euro that the Dutch government has earmarked for knowledge and innovation must be invested in independent, fundamental research. This was stated in a letter that Dutch Education Minister Plasterk sent to Dutch universities and research organizations. The millions must spent on research talent, the research infrastructure and on excellent research. In other words, NWO‘s Veni-, Vidi- and Vici-grants will be expanded, money will be allocated to top facilities and 30 new top researchers must be hired.Champion jugglerMechanical engineering student Niels Duinker was recently crowned the Dutch Champion Juggler for 2007. To win the title, he had to beat around 40 other competitors and had to perform ten acts: with balls, with rings and with pins. He performed the nine of the ten acts flawlessly. Just like gymnastics, juggling is a sport judged by a jury. The degree of difficultly of an act determines a certain number of starting points, and mistakes result in point deductions. Winning the title will be good for Duinker's career. It is easier for the entertainment agencies he is registered with to book a champion for parties and events. Duinker performs regularly and give workshops, but when he graduates he hopes to get a job performing on a cruise ship. This year he will receive his BSc degree, but he won't pursue his MSc degree. Duinker: "During my studies I learned to work fast, I have acquired knowledge and discipline and I know about computers. But now I want to go further with juggling."Solar TeamLast week TU Twente unveiled its new solar-powered car. It was the first team in the Netherlands to reveal the car they will be racing in at this year's World Solar Challenge, which will be held in Australia in October. With an innovative adjustable solar panel, the Twente team is aiming to beat their main rivals, TU Delft's Nuna team, which in 2005 won this prestigious solar-powered car race for the third consecutive time.ChampIt was a home match for the France born sailor Thierry Schmitter. Last week the TU Delft alumnus won the Semaine Olympique Franaise gold medal in the paralympic 2.4-classs. Schmitter had won the title even before the last race was sailed. "I have really earned this," the proud sailor said. Schmitter, who a climbing accident left a paraplegic, has been sailing since his youth. To continue to improve, he trains 130 days a year.Bright flight An engineering brain drain is prompting Europe’s largest economy to seek reforms and to try to tempt its talented flock back to the nest, according to a recent article in ASEE Prism. Many German companies have mandatory retirement policies that kick in at age 55, so every year some 60,000 engineers who are still in their prime leave the workforce. In addition, many educated professionals are leaving the country for better opportunities elsewhere . almost 145,000 last year, which is a 32% increase compared to 2001 figures. German engineers offer various reasons for leaving: a difficult labor market, high unemployment rates (now 10.2%), and high taxes (particularly social welfare costs). Solutions being considered by the German government include lowering barriers to importing engineers from other countries, increasing the number of engineering graduates in specific fields, and educational reform that will help future generations of engineers remain marketable throughout their entire careers.

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